Well, kinda. If the right team calls, David Weathers says he’ll listen, but it doesn’t sound like the phone is ringing off the hook.

I will freely admit that my dislike for Weathers has been completely irrational. He always seemed like a great guy, his teammates clearly liked him, and he really had some great moments for the Reds*. The bad moments just added up for me, I guess. If he never pitches again, he had a great career and Redleg Nation wishes him the best.

*That said, I hope the Reds aren’t the team that gives him a call. My heart can’t take it.

16 Responses

  1. BJ Ruble

    As much as it might hurt you to hear this Chad, he was a productive reliever for the Reds. ๐Ÿ˜€ Heck, he was one of the most consistent for a long time.

    He drove me nuts too, but more times that not, he got out of it. I still take him over Mike Lincoln any day!

    • RiverCity Redleg

      As much as it might hurt you to hear this Chad, he was a productive reliever for the Reds. Heck, he was one of the most consistent for a long time. He drove me nuts too, but more times that not, he got out of it. I still take him over Mike Lincoln any day!

      You couldn’t have summed it up any better. He was our best reliever for a few years there. He was never dominant or flashy, but usually did what it took to get the job done. The problem was that he never made it easy.

  2. Mark in cc.

    I have to echo the two comments above. He at least now doesn’t have to carry Chad around on his back anymore.

  3. per14

    The thing about Stormy was that it almost seemed he had been lucky. He’ dpost good ERAs with low strikeouts and high hit rates. And I was always just waiting for that luck to even out where he’d had a terrible run. But it never really happened. Maybe he wasn’t just lucky…

  4. Chad Dotson

    I admitted in the post above that my dislike for Stormy was completely irrational. What more do you want from me?

    • Matt WI

      So what you’re saying is, if the Reds have an injury and ring up his phone, you’d welcome him back with open arms. ๐Ÿ˜†

      I admitted in the post above that my dislike for Stormy was completely irrational. What more do you want from me?

  5. Glenn

    He did stress test my heart a few times but I would still take him over Mike Lincoln.

  6. hoosierdad

    You gotta figure with a nickname like “Stormy” that he would strike fear into both the batter and the REDS fan from time to time. Not a great pitcher, but not a terrible one. And from all appearances a great guy in the clubhouse. Enjoy your retirement John David Weathers aka Stormy!

  7. Greenie55

    My son owns has the game ball from Stormy’s last major league save. We were at the Nats game that was rain delayed in the ninth — went extra’s – deep into the morning. We were one of about 100 people left. After the last out, Stormy flipped the ball to him. I told him that would likely be his last major league save — so far, I am right. Maybe I’ll give it back to him someday?

  8. earl

    Stormy is generally OK if you put him up against the bottom of the lineup or against hitters that are not too patient.
    Put him up against the heart of a good batting order against people that work a count, and you better get a stick to bite watching him pitch. That being said, he still would sometimes get it done against the big bats, it just wasn’t too pretty to watch.

    Weathers pretty much had one pitcht that worked, and that was either hitting the low inside corner on a lefty or the low outside corner on a right handed hitter. If he was getting that call, he was good, if not, old boy would really get sweaty and David was already a pretty sweaty pitcher.

    W****** made me crazy, but he won some games too.

  9. hoosierdad

    @earl: In Stormy’s best year with the REDS he led the league in finishing games. He finished 60 games. Pretty impressive. But that was in his prime. Towards the end it could get pretty ugly sometimes.

  10. preach

    Earl hit it on the head. If the ump was giving David the low strike on that little cut slider, he was going to be pretty tough because batters would have to start swinging at bad balls. If he wasn’t getting that pitch, he would have to come into the zone and his stuff there just wasn’t that good.

    All in all, an excellent career, especially since he wasn’t dominating with his stuff.

  11. pinson343

    Yes about Weathers needing the low strike zone. For that matter, he also needed a broad strike zone. He would pitch good hitters away, then try to sneak one by on the inside corner. That was always scary to watch. But the guy had a very solid 4 and a half year stretch with the Reds, surprisingly good numbers.

    I was as nervous as anyone when he would come in with the game on the line, but he did come thru more often than not. He pitched with his brain and with courage. He knew who to pitch around, and who he could (usually) get out.

    The problem was when he couldn’t pitch around a top hitter. His facing Pujols with the bases loaded was such a mismatch, he should have walked him.

    All the best, Stormy !!!

  12. earl

    “His facing Pujols with the bases loaded was such a mismatch, he should have walked him.”

    That sequence last year is one that I keep in mind about Dusty’s use of the bullpen. Baker will get greedy and wait until the situation is pretty much setup to fail for his reliever coming in.

    Even with a completely dominating reliever, say like Billy Wagner when he was with the Astros and could throw 100+ or say Rivera, putting them in with the bases loaded to face Pujols is going to fail probably 50/50 and with David Weathers.

    If I remember right on that Pujols grand slam it was 2nd 3rd, some other reliver might have gotten 1 out and loaded the bases then Weathers came in. Dusty should have gone to the pen right after the first person reached base or even better than that started on the pen that inning. He did that a few times last year and gambled and lost. Occasionally it would work, but I know Adrian Gonzales, Manny and Fielder got us the same situation last year where you are pretty much in a Red Russian Roulette situation where you either walk in a run or face a top clean up hitter.

    That one in LA, if it would have been Dibble, he would have just hit Manny. (But hey, it might have only been 1 run instead of four.):mrgreen: