From the DDN:

For the series, Dunn was on base 12 times — a home run, a single, two doubles, six walks, two hit by pitches.

“I’m getting more and more excited managing Adam Dunn,” said Nationals manager Jim Riggleman. “He is in his prime. He took a lot of walks in this series. When you come back to where you grew up (baseball-wise), there is a tendency to try to hit everything out of the park. He didn’t ever go out of the strike zone.”

On the year, Dunn is hitting .285/.417/.580.

But he doesn’t provide veteran leadership.

69 Responses

  1. shane

    He’s a good ballplayer. He’s a good hitter. But he obviously isn’t great or you guys wouldn’t feel the constant need to defend him. I haven’t read anything recently that was anyone dissing him and yet you still feel that overpowering need to defend him.

  2. CeeKeR

    …but Dunn won’t steal 100 bases like Taveras promised he would. Oh wait.

  3. GregD

    Defending Dunn?
    Or pointing out that management
    (1) let him get away
    (2) made no effort to sign him when he was a free agent w/o loss of draft pick

    The money Taveras & Lincoln & Weathers.
    LF production this year has been
    .233avg/.299obp/.395slg
    OPS+ of 78

  4. pinson343

    Noone feels a need to defend him, his productivity and our lack of offense speak for themselves. We’re not defending, we’re venting.
    And the people who so badly wanted him out of Cincy have been very, very quiet.
    The Adam Dunn trade sucked, one of WJ’s big blunders. We got next to nothing in return. One of the complaints against him was that he “refused” to play first base.
    Yet he’s fine with it now. This means that it was the Reds’ management who didn’t want him at first base. Well, you might say, Joey Votto plays first base.
    But the organization played Votto some in LF in AAA and the reports were that he handled it well. But would this organization make a bold move like putting Dunn at first base and Votto in LF ? No, because it’s a chicken sh*t organization.

    I don’t personally think Dunn is a great player, BTW, just a very good one. The only very good player on the roster now is Joey Votto, and one is not enough.

  5. shane

    Nope. Just defending Dunn. One of you guys should make a http://www.worshipping_Dunn.com blog so we could get back to the Reds on Redlegnation. Sheesh, I like him too but he’s gone, pretty sure he’s not coming back, so get over it.

  6. David

    Until it is defeinitively established that Dunn actually WANTED to be in Cincinnati, all of this posturing is ridiculous. You have no idea if the Reds offered Dunn a contract. You have no idea if Dunn said, “I don’t care what you offer, I’m not playing here.” I know these concepts are difficult for many to comprehend, because Dunn was a fan favorite. It’s difficult for some to believe that Dunn didn’t love the city like the city loved Dunn. It’s classic abandonment denial. Scapegoat ownership as much as you want. Dunn is not here. Why? Because, it’s easier to say that the Reds’ lot in life is because management ran Dunn out of town.

  7. shane

    One of the complaints against him was that he “refused” to play first base.
    Yet he’s fine with it now. This means that it was the Reds’ management who didn’t want him at first base

    No, it doesn’t necessarily mean that at all. People have a change of heart. They change their minds. Maybe that’s what Dunn did. It happens. Until somebody shows links to definite facts that he wanted to play first base here and the Reds wouldn’t let him, we don’t know.

  8. pinson343

    Yes Shane, until we see definite facts that Dunn didn’t want to play first, we don’t know. I personally don’t know. But he would have played first if told to, and that’s a decision management is supposed to make. I flat out disbelieve any rumor that he was told to play first base and refused.

  9. shane

    And would have been unhappy about being forced to do something he had told them he didn’t want to do, and it might have affected his play and his hitting. He’s already admitted (the link was posted here a few months ago) that he didn’t work as hard as he could have here and is working harder for the Nationals, why is it so hard to believe that he didn’t want to play first here? maybe if he was working as hard there as he was when here, his average would be somewhere around the .230 that it was when he was here

  10. pinson343

    David, you make good points. Dunn said he wanted to stay, he still says he likes Castellini and Cincinnati, but we don’t know what actually took place.
    My main point about the organization is that we didn’t get enough in return. And I’ve already had my say about the first base option.

  11. pinson343

    (9) All possibly true. And if so why the overnite change when he moves from the Reds to the Nationals ? It’s not like he’s moved to a contending team. It seems to me that he’s being managed better, he’s being coached better. He’s happier there, and it’s not because he’s with a better team.

  12. RC

    And as I said in another thread, Dunn’s now hitting fourth with a guy hitting over .300 with pop hitting behind him to apply the plunger to those clogged bases. Think he might get challenged more and pitched around less nowadays than he did last year hitting sixth with whoever the heck our #7 hitter was last year? And yet we had similarly dropped Bruce into the shameful 6 hole this year. How about a little protection for our best power bat when he comes back?

  13. Bill Lack

    I really didn’t mean to be…I like Dunn, I wish he was still a Red, they made a bad deal moving him (and he played some 1B in Arizona last year also). I don’t remember ever reading a quote from Dunn saying he didn’t want to play 1B while with the Reds (I’ve heard fans say he didn’t want to, but don’t ever remember reading an actual quote.) The Reds would be a better team with him than they’ve been without him, I said that last year, in the off season, and before the season. And he would have been cheaper than Scott Rolen.

  14. Steve

    Get a grip.

    Even with Dunn having the great offensive year he is in 2009, when you factor in his atrocious defense, his WAR:

    1.8

    Here are his UZR/150 (defense) numbers for 2009:

    Left Field: -24.3
    Right Field: -38.8

    Well, as you’d rightly point out, he’s no longer playing the OF. Check out his UZR/150 at 1B:

    -39.0

    That’s the worst rating for any 1B with more than 200 innings. In fact, the next lowest is -14.6. And only one other 1B is in negative double-digits.

    Dunn’s current WAR is 1.8 based on a UZR primarily on his OF play, so it will go down as he (mis)plays more time at 1B.

    Meanwhile, Scott Rolen’s WAR for 2009:

    2.8

  15. Sultan of Swaff

    At the time we traded him, he wasn’t worth the $15 mil/year we all suspected we would receive in free agency, and rightly so given his numbers on offense and defense. But when you raise your average 50 points and stick him at first base, his WAR rating shoots straight up. One of those two moves (swapping Dunn and Votto) should’ve been tried by a franchise that is anything but progressive, the batting average was a luck of the draw.

  16. Steve Price

    On the subject of being a fan favorite, as is true for many of the Reds’ players, our best players seem to polarize them as to how the team is playing.

    I would turn off radio talk shows about the Reds when I heard all these people complaining about Dunn.

    I don’t put a lot of faith into the “protection” theory, but I do understand the concept of “pitching around” a hitter. They’re not necessarily the same, but when you get a selective hitter in a pitch around situation it can be frustrating to a fan, especially on a called third strike.

    Dunn’s “clutch” numbers weren’t poor, to the casual fan taking a called third strike is heresy. I see it/hear it/ preach it to Little Leaguers now; yet I know hitting a “ball” is more likely to result in an out than swinging at strikes. Dunn’s patience in those situations was actually a virtue, but in baseball the stars are going to make an out 6-7 times out of 10…a strikeout is no different than any other out in reality, but it’s that “lost opportunity” that drove people crazy.

    For the record…I saw the Dunn quote, too, about not working hard…coming to Cincinnati, Dunn had a record of being one of the hardest workers in the Reds’ systems, a football training mentality. Kearns didn’t have the work ethic, but had the baseball smarts; Dunn had the ethic, but not the baseball instinct.

    Now, Washington says he works hard. May be he wasn’t getting the right instruction on what to work on? Doesn’t poor coaching/management here in Cincinnati seem to be a common theme today? Why is it only that “Dunn” didn’t work hard…do we blame all the other players singularly, too?

  17. Steve

    One of the explanations for Dunn’s improved batting average this year is…luck.

    His BABIP this year is .349.

    In 2008 his BABIP was .262 and career .295 – so it’s kind of unlikely that his AVG number will stay where it is.

    Don’t get me wrong, I was sort of agnostic on the Dunn trade. Steady offense, terrible defense. The defense pretty much gave away all the benefits of his offensive side.

    CLEARLY, the Reds botched the opportunity to replace him by selecting this cast of characters – Taveras, Hernandez etc. If the Reds had made a good replacement signing then we would not be pining to be paying Dunn’s salary.

    He would have probably made more than $13 million in arbitration if the Reds had kept him.

    So it’s not clear that Rolen is more expensive, in part because don’t know how much the Blue Jays are paying of 2010.

  18. Mark in CC

    When you quote Jim Riggleman, enough said.

  19. Bill Lack

    I’m not a big believer in defensive numbers, too subjective. And it wouldn’t have cost them $13M, the Nat’s got him for $10, they could have signed him in the off season, after trading him (or made an offer, at least).

    True, we don’t know what they’re paying us to take Rolen, but it’s $2M and one is still fairly young and one is not (and there is some value there).

  20. Steve

    (#20)I’m not a big believer in defensive numbers, too subjective.

    Spoken like Dusty Baker.

  21. jdarts84

    Who gives a sh**, he’s gone and he’s never coming back. While you’re at it lets go over the Hamilton trade now that Volquez is hurt. Hindsight is 20/20 when talking about the Dunn trade anyways, before the trade he was a .250 lifetime hitter (I know that stat will upset those of you that say batting average is overrated) and struck out 150+ times. Fact is that most scouts have said time and time again that Dunn did seem uninspired in his play while in Cincinnati, and his defense or lackthereof negated what he did at the plate. (Which lets face it was HR or nothing here, anybody else remember that?) What changed in Washington? Was it coaching? A change of scenery? All I know is the deal would’ve worked out much smoother had Jocketty gone out and signed SOMETHING to replace the 40 and 100, you can’t expect to platoon guys like Gomes and Nix all year and gain that kind of productivity. That’s the only part of the trade that upsets me, leaving the spot vacant and expecting role guys to fill the void.

  22. Steve

    Bill, lol, yeah, I know that’s the lowest blow possible, so low I was worried it might violate the blog policy vs. abusive language. 😉

  23. jdarts84 (language free response)

    While you’re at it lets go over the Hamilton trade now that Volquez is hurt. Hindsight is 20/20 when talking about the Dunn trade anyways, before the trade he was a .250 lifetime hitter (I know that stat will upset those of you that say batting average is overrated) and struck out 150+ times. Fact is that most scouts have said time and time again that Dunn did seem uninspired in his play while in Cincinnati, and his defense or lackthereof negated what he did at the plate. (Which lets face it was HR or nothing here, anybody else remember that?) What changed in Washington? Was it coaching? A change of scenery? All I know is the deal would’ve worked out much smoother had Jocketty gone out and signed SOMETHING to replace the 40 and 100, you can’t expect to platoon guys like Gomes and Nix all year and gain that kind of productivity. That’s the only part of the trade that upsets me, leaving the spot vacant and expecting role guys to fill the void. THAT BETTER PREACH?

  24. Travis G.

    the deal would’ve worked out much smoother had Jocketty gone out and signed SOMETHING to replace the 40 and 100, you can’t expect to platoon guys like Gomes and Nix all year and gain that kind of productivity.

    Ab-so-lute-ly.

    I’ll even allow that the Reds weren’t going to replace all 40 of those homers on their budget, but going into the season counting on Brandon Phillips as your everyday cleanup hitter is irresponsibly optimistic. (Don’t forget that Gomes was exposed to waivers and spent five weeks marinating in Louisville before he got called up.)

  25. David

    How can anyone objectively argue the Dunn trade was a bad one? Wilkin Castillo, Dallas Buck and Micah Owings is a pretty good get for two months of Adam Dunn. Ignoring Castillo and Buck, the Reds got back a young, established, major league starter. He isn’t going to wow anyone with his stuff, but he is a capable 10-win-potential pitcher at the back end of a rotation. Considering the DBacks got no compensation in picks, this was a good deal, as Dunn was gone at the end of the season.

    Doesn’t it seem odd to anyone that there was little interest shown in Dunn this winter? Most commentators blamed Dunn’s defense i.e. the man without a position. Truth be told, he HAD to switch to first base because once it appeared like Manny was going to be signed by the Dodgers, NO TEAM wanted Dunn in LF.

  26. jdarts84

    David, the excuse often used for the little to no interest being showed in Dunn this winter(outside Jim Bowden, go figure)was the economy being down.

  27. GregD

    I don’t think we know whether there was “little interest” or “great interest”. But we do know with any situation, the context of price is always important. I would say with any good free agent player, there is always interest from most clubs, depending on the price.

    I’d expect most teams had “interest” in Teixeira or Ramirez, but not at the prices that the Dodgers or Yankees paid.

    Similarly, I think Dunn’s agent had a poor offseason. While some of his comps were going around signing deals for $8-10 million per year, Dunn was still trying to get more than $10M. If he had been willing to sign for Pat Burrell money, he likely would have been signed earlier in the offseason.

    If the Dodgers would have signed Dunn instead of Manny, they could have Harang (or Arroyo) and still have a lower payroll than what they have today with Manny.

  28. shane

    Also, playing 1st base might have been a stipulation of the contract

  29. RiverCity Redleg

    I am a Dunn fan, but they would have way overpaid mkt value if they would have picked his option.

  30. Matt Steele

    I want to say alot here but I won’t because it’s obvious there’s basically two camps to this whole issue and while the let’s get Dunn out now crowd seems to be focusing on the “fact” “assumption” “made up justification with no ability to prove it” that Dunn didn’t want to play here.

    my stand on this whole issue is that I would have rather have offered Dunn arbitration and had him decline and take the draft picks then have Micah Owings etc on our team. If Dunn didn’t want to play here, then he could have declined arbitration and if he did want to play here he would have been worth a lot more than what we spent on Willy Taveras etc.

    Also, the last game that Dunn played in Cincinnati as a Red I had the opportunity to get some nice seats and ended up sitting next to some former Dunn coach (not sure what level) basically he pointed out that Dunn had played first basemen a lot in his younger days. I don’t know how to verify it but I hesitate at the notion that Dunn refused to play first base. Wasn’t it just a few months ago we thought that Brandon Phillips refused to play SS? Now he wants to?

  31. shane

    if he did want to play here he would have been worth a lot more than what we spent on Willy Taveras
    good luck finding anybody to disagree with that

  32. shane

    Wasn’t it just a few months ago we thought that Brandon Phillips refused to play SS? these are PEOPLE! people change their minds, either on their on, or talked into it

  33. shane

    either on their *own*, or talked into it

  34. Jason in Toronto

    Hey, we signed Leake and Boxburger!

  35. REDS1

    #27 AGREED! You knew that they weren’t going to replace him. It seems like this franchise is always lookings for ways to DUMP salary. I can’t believe that pattern over time is a good one.

    In regards to Dunn you can talk defense all you want but this team needs his power and would far better off if they had him.

    I find it very interesting that the Reds franchise in the 1970’s and 1990’s didn’t seem to have trouble spending money, putting butts in the seats and turning a proft. But now its constantly were small market we afford to this or that. Think like a loser and you will be a loser.

  36. Jason in Toronto

    Why ARE the Reds small market? Because they think small market.

  37. David

    Matt – It’s not a “fact” “assumption” “made up justification with no ability to prove it” that Dunn didn’t want to play here. In fact, I am actually indifferent on Dunn. He’s a good offensive player and can’t play a lick of defense. I consider him a poor man’s Jim Thome. He is a value on offense only – that’s great for a team in need of a DH, but the Reds weren’t that. So I can understand the idea of closing the book on the Dunn/Griffey era.

    I will come to the defense of the Reds to challenge those who claim the Reds ran him out of town. The truth of the matter is that none of us are privy to the negotiations. We don’t know if Dunn wanted to be here or not. My point, is that it takes a meeting of the minds to form a contract and here we don’t know why there was no meeting of the minds.

    It’s simply an annoyance, much like people saying we could have gotten more for Kearns/Lopez. Nobody knows what was available. That’s just fact.

    Yet the Kearns/Lopez trade and the loss of Dunn are the rallying cries of all who disdain the organization’s recent history. It’s unfortunate is all.

  38. Matt Steele

    sure I agree with that and for what it’s worth I thought the Kearns trade was a poor one but I don’t get that upset about it like I do with the Dunn one.

    I definitely don’t know what went on behind the scenes but I’m not trying to use that as justification for anything. My simple belief is that it would have been better to hang on to Dunn and offer him arbitration. If he accepts, great and if not, then we get an extra draft and still have money to use. Instead we got Micah Owings, Castillo and Dallas Buck. Buck is the only one that I still have hope will develop into anything. Owings has never been anything special and I don’t think he ever will be.

    Does Dunn have limitations? certainly, he’s not a HOF player. But he would have absolutely helped our offense this year.

  39. Drew Nelson

    If Dunn is so great and all that then:

    1) Why did no one but the Nationals want him?
    2) Why did no one want him at the trade deadline?

    I mean the Red Sox are SCREAMING for a bat and didn’t go after him. You can’t tell me the Dodgers wouldn’t mind having another bat added to their O. If Dunn is all that then why is he were he is making what he is?

  40. justcorbly

    Yeah, but they were losers with him, and they are losers without him. And no one is buying post-season Nationals tickets.

    Dunn remains a flawed baseball player. I.e., someone you cannot count on.

  41. RC

    I’ll answer the last question – He wasn’t all that. But he wasn’t nothing, either. Here’s my question – If Dunn had been switched to 1B several years ago, what’s the difference between him and Ryan Howard?

  42. Mike Martz

    I liked Dunn when he was a RED, but now eh not so much.
    Besides, who needs Dunn when we got GOMES! He looks much better in the sombrero than Dunn would! :clown:

  43. David

    Matt – The only dispute I have with you is your assumption the Reds would have gotten compensation. The DBacks didn’t offer him arbitration because of the economy. They traded believing they could afford to do so. The Reds may have been better off financially, enough to offer arb. However, I don’t know. Also, it is pretty likely that had the Reds offered him arbitration and Dunn declined, they would not have gotten any picks. Remember that there was a real lack of interest in him EVEN THOUGH signing him cost no draft picks. Imagine the lack of interest had a team been required to give up picks.

  44. aaron

    Dusty never won a division without a 40 HR slugger and it appears he wont again without one. But I also suspect the change of scenery for Dunn was necessary because of the influence he had watching Jr. loaf as he came up. I am still a huge Dunn fan but can understand the trade only if the Reds had replaced his 40 HRs 100 rbi and near 400 OBP.

  45. GregD

    If Dunn had been switched to 1B several years ago, what’s the difference between him and Ryan Howard?

    The Phillies supporting staff, especially Utley batting in front of him.

    I did a comparison a year or two ago. Something like 50-60% of Howard’s plate appearances came with runners on base. Dunn had about 40-45% of his plate appearances with runners on base. Dunn hit the bases empty that much more.

  46. Steve Price

    1. It’s a shame Griffey kept getting hurt loafing on all his hustle injuries. May be if he had loafed more, he wouldn’t have gotten hurt and couldn’ve played more games. After all…the Reds told him to quit hustling because he was getting hurt.

    2. Prediction time: don’t be surprised if Adam Dunn makes it to the Hall of Fame. He and Pujols may come out the only “pure” sluggers of this era, and it will be hard to refute those 600 clean home runs.

  47. shane

    don’t be surprised?? I’ll be extremely surprised

  48. preach

    2. Prediction time: don’t be surprised if Adam Dunn makes it to the Hall of Fame. He and Pujols may come out the only “pure” sluggers of this era, and it will be hard to refute those 600 clean home runs.

    I’m assuming you are putting Griffey in a previous era, as most of his career is behind him. Dunn will have to hit 500 HR to be considered. None of his other stats will enable it. Both Griffey and Pujols have had more than one dimension to their game. OBP will never be ‘sexy’ enough for the HOF.

  49. Mark in CC

    Really only need to replace 30 HR and 80 rbi if you factor in defense and base running. Of course if he hadn’t refused to play 1B in Cincy, with that wonderfull hustling team attitude he had, he might have had more value.

  50. Matt WI

    As good as Dunn is (and I’m comfortable saying he is good), I think it still comes down to the numbers. The Reds could not have avoided paying him more than any other team in MLB. Even with his offense, this team would probably still be scraping by at .500 with Willy T at the top of the line-up and management would count Dunn’s contract as yet another albatross like Harang’s, Arroyo’s, and Cordero’s before doing something proactive. I don’t mind the return on the trade… Given his contract situation and the limited time left in the season, we got what we got. Owings isn’t the complete disaster some make him out to be. He’s (Owings) tradable in a package, if nothing else, unlike Taveras.

  51. Steve Price

    Harmon Killebrew is a Hall of Famer without a position, 576 home runs, and a .376 OBP.

    And,yes, OBP will be sexier in thirty years as will a host of other things that will be studied at the time.

    To those Dunn detractors, defense may be more easily defined, too.

    However, I think the power game will be in decline over the next few years and Dunn will come across more uniquely because of this and that will help his Hall of Fame case.

    He’s the fourth fastest major leaguer to get to 300 home runs.

    From baseball-reference.com:

    Similar Batters through 28

    Darryl Strawberry (921)
    Jose Canseco (907)
    Harmon Killebrew (903) *
    Rocky Colavito (896)
    Reggie Jackson (891) *
    Troy Glaus (869)
    Tom Brunansky (867)
    Barry Bonds (862)
    Roger Maris (861)
    Boog Powell (857)
    * – Signifies Hall of Famer

    Under 900 is not truly similar by definition.

  52. Chris Garber

    Whatever, Steve. Didn’t you hear? His teams were losers with him, and they are losers without him. And he was “someone you cannot count on.”

    Like Ted Williams.

  53. Steve Price

    I wonder how Killebrew’s Twins wouldn’t have done had they not had Tony Oliva, Zoilo Versalles, Bob Allison, Camilo Pascual, Jim Perry, and Mudcat Grant?

    Killebrew wasn’t appreciated for years either. He was also a “three true outcome hitter” (walk, strike out, or homer)…it took the Senators/Twins five years to just say, “how about we just let him play.”

  54. pinson343

    Dunn’s a possible Hall of Famer, but he’ll definitely need 600 HRs. Killebrew was just as “one dimensional” as Dunn.

    Others have already said much the same, I like Dunn but was actually neutral about trading him, waiting to see what the Reds did with the money saved.

    They spent it on Hernandez and Taveras. Ugh. I have no idea how much the Reds spent on Scott Rolen. I actually think there was some good reasoning behind trading for him, but I’ll save that for another day. (The Rolen trade could of course end up as a major disaster.)

    I agree about moving on, we don’t know exactly where the Reds would be this year with Dunn, but they for sure wouldn’t be headed to the playoffs.

  55. pinson343

    Steve I like your Griffey comment (51). If Junior didn’t alter his style of play to “hustle only when you really think it matters” he would have had to retire before reaching age 35. When the game was on the line, he remained as reckless as in his youth. He lowered his shoulder and ran over a catcher to try to win a game while sitting on 499 HRs.

  56. Mark in CC

    “Dunn’s a possible Hall of Famer, but he’ll definitely need 600 HRs. Killebrew was just as “one dimensional” as Dunn.”

    Killebrew actually played third base and first base and was very adequate defensively. Killebrew of the early sixties was a very good all around player and played on some winning teams.

    Unfortunately a player like Paul Molitar, who only put up the numbers and longevity he did by being a DH, makes this possible.

    However the Hall of Fame should be reserved for players who excel at the whole game not just offense or a couple of aspects of offense.

  57. Steve Price

    Killebrew was not good on defense by any possible measurement. He could hit home runs, walk, and strike out.

  58. Steve Price

    Oh, and for the winning teams, as I already mentioned, Killebrew played with MVP Versalles, Oliva (should be in HOF), slugger Allison (who was an all around player), and pitchers Grant, Pascual, Perry, and a host of others.

    The Reds had counted on Griffey, Kearns, and Dunn to be the hitters, and injuries put a stop to Griffey and Kearns…and the Reds didn’t react.

  59. RC

    Pitchers generally excel at only one aspect of the game. Take Micah Owings for example – he’s an excellent hitter. (I joke because I love.) As I recall, I’ve never heard a word about Babe Ruth’s defense or lack of same. Maybe he was fantastic, I don’t know… although Babe does have his pitching to fall back on… Anyways, I imagine there are some old time HOFers who were big lumbering Dunnish oafs [oaves?] in the field. Or maybe I dreamed it… and you kids woke me up. Get offa my lawn!

  60. preach

    Ruth could have made the hof as a pitcher. That’s on the defensive side of the field. He also did more than just hit the longball. And the era has to be considered. Ruth was an icon. It might not be fair, but here’s where the concept of’intangibles’ comes into play, and will continue to, no matter how the statisticians feel about it. Its ironic that some of the very same behavior and habits that might have endeared players to those with voting rights in the past may cause distance with them today.

  61. RC

    Actually, now that I think about it, I did read one story about Babe’s defensive abilities. Reportedly, he offered to bet a sportswriter that he wouldn’t get hit in the head by a fly ball that season, after a second adding, “On the shoulder don’t count.” No idea if that’s true, though.

  62. aaron

    Griff may have hustled when he could make sportcenter but most of his injuries came on routine plays….. how many ground balls and pop ups did he jog out over the years. I think Homer Bailey probably has a faster average to first than Jr.

  63. Steve Price

    Ken Griffey Injury History
    1987:15 day DL/Shoulder injury

    1988:15 day DL/Strained Back

    1989:30 day DL/Broken Bone In Right Hand

    1992:15 day DL/Sprained ligament In Wrist

    1995:73 day DL/ Two Broken Bones In Wrist

    1996:15 day DL/ Broken Hamlet Bone In Left Wrist

    2000:15 day DL/Torn Hamstring

    2001:50 day DL/ Torn Hamstring

    2002:90 day DL/Torn Patella Tendon/Strained Hamstring/partially dislocated right kneecap

    2003:110day DL/dislocated sholder/Ruptered Ankle Tendon

    2004:80 day DL/Torn Hamstring off bone

    2005:40 days missed/Knee issues

    2006:50 days missed/Knee issues/broke hand in offseason

    2007:15 days missed/groin injury

    2008:20 days missed/Knee drained three times

    Didn’t the Reds ask, or may be I should say, direct Griffey to QUIT diving for balls? I would term that a business decision.